Montgomeryshire Beekeepers Association
What to plant in your garden to attract bees and other pollinators.

However large or small your garden, or whether it be in pots on a patio, there are lots of plants you can add which will be of benefit to our little friends.
With a lot of their natural habitat destroyed, we can help pollinating insects by choosing the right kind of plants for them.
It's not just plants that are important, they also need water to drink.
Bees are most attracted to open centred plants. Blousy, frilly flowers look nice, but pollinators cannot get inside to access nectar and pollen.
Sadly, most of the UK has very few meadows left now. If you have enough space for one, and it doesn't have to be big, there are wild flower seed suppliers on line with a range of seed to suit all types of soils.

Finally, leave an untidy corner in your garden for wildlife. They like log piles, leaves and if you have any spare lumps of wood, drill holes into it for insects to over winter.
Alternatively, there are bug hotels available to attach to a wall or garden shed.
Early Spring:
 
One of the earliest flowering bulbs are Snowdrops and Crocus
Some of the smaller varieties of daffodils
Dandelions are a good source of forage for bumblebees, so keep some in your lawn
Appleblossom and other fruit tree blossoms
Hazel catkins
Bluebells
Cowslips

Spring:

Grape Hyacinth
Lesser Celandine
Comfrey
Forget me not
Campanula
Muscari
Ribes – flowering currant 

Early Summer:

Bugle
Honeysuckle
Chives
Alliums – the lovely tall varieties are a magnet for bees
Cranesbill – hardy geranium
Sallvia


Summer:

Clover
Cornflower
Open centred roses such as the dog rose and Rosa Rugosa varieties
Lavender
Nepeta – catmint
Red hot Poker
Bergamot
Hollyhock
Rosebay willow herb
Buddleia
Late Summer and Autumn:
 
Rosa Rugosa species are open centred with a delightful perfume and very attractive to pollinators.
In late summer and through Autumn, butterflies and birds feed on the lovely tomato hips.

Autumn:

Mint
Mahonia
Ivy – this is one of the latest flowers for pollen and nectar
Heather
Knapweed – (late summer into early Autumn)

Winter:

Gorse
Hellebore
Ground Ivy




Trees:
There are lots of tree and hedge, bee friendly plants, so worth thinking about if you have the space in your garden.

Hawthorn
Cherry
Goat Willow
Hazel
Rowan
Lime
Plum
Horse Chestnut
Apple
Blackthorn – can be invasive, but excellent for a variety of insects.




Many of the above plants and smaller trees can be grown in containers. Potted herbs such as Oregano, Marjoram and flowering Thymes are also very attractive to pollinators.
A comprehensive leaflet is available from the Welsh Beekeepers' Assocaition.
Visit www.wbka .

We hope our suggestions are of help, but should you need further advice, please contact us through our website.

Copyright Montgomeryshire Beekeepers Association
Site design LFCNUTTER